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Duel At Silver Creek [DVD]

£9.9£99Clearance
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Unashamedly pulpy is this Western, no surprise when you see that it's an early film from legend Don Siegel.

The Duel at Silver Creek is a 1952 American Western film directed by Don Siegel; his first film in the Western genre. Web icon An illustration of a computer application window Wayback Machine Texts icon An illustration of an open book. More Hamburger icon An icon used to represent a menu that can be toggled by interacting with this icon.Ruthless claim-jumpers, femme fatale guile, tenacious lawman, vengeful quickdraw-turned-deputy: The Duel At Silver Creek is lean, pulpy, ‘50s b-western fun. Tyrone pursues the treacherous Opal Lacey ( Faith Domergue), who is secretly in league with the claim jumpers, and Cromwell falls for tomboy Dusty Fargo ( Susan Cabot) who is only interested in Lightning.

The local marshal, "Lightning" Tyrone (Stephen McNally), is also tracking the gang, but receives a crippling injury during a gunfight. Meanwhille, Marshal Lightnin' Tyrone is also after the gang; recovering from one raid, he meets femme fatale Opal Lacy, who may not be healthy for him to know. Participating in the proceedings are Faith Domergue, Susan Cabot and Eugene Iglesias, who gives the film's best performance. Slimy brutal villains and great characters abound in a film that sure doesn’t feel like Don Siegel’s first crack at the Wild West.There’s enough action, and it moves along quickly enough, that it’s hard to fault the movie for anything. A half-hearted attempt to steer a little Western slightly off the beaten trail was unfolded with the Palace's new stage show yesterday. The screen play written by Gerald Drayson Adams and Joseph Hoffman familiarly stacks the motivations and incidents and, unfortunately, blunts some picaresque possibilities.

A gang of claim jumpers is infesting the territory, gaining ownership of undermanned mining operations through extortion. I came to this film on the basis of it being Don Siegel's first western and the first film he made in colour.Additionally, Audie Murphy's cropped, black leather jacket is sweet as hell, and this early Lee Marvin role as a local shit disturber reveals just how early he settled into playing sexy, smirking dirtbags. I don't know what surprised me the most, a western directed by Don Siegel and such a clean one (in the sense it is not very gritty and it follows the plot points of most westerns of the 50's) or the fact that Lee Marvin once had hair which was not white. don 'the don' siegel directs with intense grit -- a comparative trifle, but the seeds of greatness to come; the rare one of his films that actually has interesting female characters, including a high-femme villain!

Tyrone deputizes Cromwell, and the two take on the murderers together, while trying to resist the charms of Opal (Faith Domergue), the new beauty in town. By joining TV Guide, you agree to our Terms of Use and acknowledge the data practices in our Privacy Policy. We hear his narration of the case of a gang of claim-jumpers led by Gerald Mohr as Rod Lacy, Opal's slimy brother.Though it does suffer from the bevy of clichés befitting for one of its genre in 1952, The Duel at Silver Creek is pretty satisfying for things you know you want to see in a Siegel feature (B-movie efficiency, surprising violence, straight-up cool noir vibes) but also some things you might not expect (a femme fetale, brilliant tracking shots, and terrific costumes). A young cowboy played by real life war hero turned movie star Audie Murphy is on a revenge quest after the claim jumping bastards. Faith Domergue was so striking and charismatic, it’s unfortunate that she never rose above B pictures.

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